Dissertation References Bibliography

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references and bibliography

Correctly referencing

Referencing is the method used to ensure that other research influences are recognised within your dissertation. Referencing includes a citation within the text of your dissertation and a list of references at the end of your dissertation. It is imperative that you use correct referencing in your dissertation project to ensure that you avoid being accused of plagiarism. Any dissertation and assessments written during your time at university will be assessed on the quality of your referencing which will contribute towards your overall grade. Referencing also ensures that you can demonstrate how your ideas build upon the research of others. If someone is reading your dissertation, they should be able to use your referencing to find the books and articles you have used to help with your research. This is also useful in published articles - if you read an interesting article you may find the items on the reference list interesting too.

When you summarise, refer to, or quote from an author's work in your document, you need to acknowledge your source in the text. In Harvard, you do this by putting the author’s name, publication year, and page number in round brackets (if applicable).

Example: (Forster, 2011, p.22)

In the reference list, you then put the full details of the reference to enable a reader to trace the source of information that you used:

Example: Forster, D. (2011) The art of warranty; 2nd ed. London: Remington Press

Check with your University to see whether you are referencing in the Oxford or Harvard style. Either way, your bibliography should contain a full list if books, journals, articles, films, computer games, comic books and websites that you referenced in the abstract, introduction, chapters and conclusion of your dissertation. Examples of referencing format;

Books: Name, date. Title. Place of publication: Publisher. If it’s been edited or translated, put Ed. Name. or Trans. Name. before the place of publication.
eg. Peterson, S., 2010. A New Life of Dante. Bristol: University of Bristol (UEW) Press.

Films: Title (Director, Date)
eg. Clerks (Kevin Smith, 1994).

Websites: Author, date. Title. Available at http://www.webaddress.com (date accessed).
eg. Parker, D., 1996. The World of Dante. Available at http://www.worldofdante.org/about.html [Accessed 04, May 2013]

Remember, a reference list is a list of all the information sources that you have cited in your text. A bibliography is a list of items that you have read, and has informed your thinking, but not specifically cited in your assignment. Check the requirements for each module with your tutor. Your list should be completed in alphabetical order by author's surname regardless of the format of the information source.

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Name
price
      LEVEL
  • Marketing Strategy
  • HRM Practices
  • Business Strategy 
  • TESCO Management
  • International Business
  • Building Studies
  • International Finance
  • Global Business
  • Employee Relations
  • £55
  • £55
  • £55
  • £55
  • £55
  • £55
  • £55
  • £55
  • £55
  • MSc
  • MSc
  • BA
  • MBA
  • MA
  • BSc
  • MSc
  • MBA
  • BSc

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