Best University Dissertation Examples

Dissertation Examples

We believe that reading and examining others work is the best way to complete your own work perfectly, so before starting dissertation writing, students must remember and take care of analyzing others work first. This is where dissertation examples come into their element. Writing a dissertation is not difficult if you have searched for existing dissertations that will help you in writing your own dissertation. This would cover what structure and format you should follow up until the point of submission. Below are some guidelines to ensure that you will get the best dissertation examples and ideas:

University Libraries

If you are looking for dissertation examples then look at what your university library has to offer. This is the best possible place where you can find credible work from previous graduates and your university has elected to keep the dissertation examples on file for future use for other university students. Browsing a university library is the most authentic method when choosing a title or topic for your own dissertation.

Internet

The most accessible source where you can find dissertation examples is the internet. You will instantly gain access to a plethora dissertations across a wide variety of subjects. Be mindful that the dissertations you are viewing have no doubt already been submitted to universities and the contents have been used by many students in the same way you wish to use the contents. Don’t be tempted to cut and paste any online content from any dissertation examples you encounter as you will fail your degree unless you reference appropriately in accordance with your university guidelines.

Evaluating Relevant Material

Here you will be utilising existing material you have already written during your university studies. Take a step back and look at the work you have produced in the first and second year of your degree, it is safe to say you will find material that you can add to your dissertation. In some cases students formulate a dissertation topic on previous research carried out. This is something I did during my undergraduate degree, I wrote a dissertation on entrepreneurial behaviour as previous modules in this subject area stirred my imagination and interest in this field of study.

University Dissertation Examples
University Dissertation Examples

You need to pick a project topic that is feasible, which means ‘do-able’ in the short time that you have. What is ‘feasible’? Many student project proposals are initially over- ambitious. They are often very wide-ranging in their focus and could present significant problems for students in collecting primary data. The best projects are those where:

  • The topic is of particular interest to you
  • You can easily collect information – the information is readily available, or you can collect and analyse it easily, and within a short time period
  • The aim of the project is focused on a particular aspect of a chosen topic

Business Dissertation Examples

The likely reason for you to examine business dissertation examples is to get a clear understanding on how to structure your own dissertation. Writing your own dissertation is usually carried out in accordance with accepted guidelines set out by at your university. This is designated to help the reader or examiner to understand exactly what message is to be conveyed in the dissertation. The best way to learn on how to best structure your business dissertation is to assess previously submitted business dissertation examples. Be sure to analyze any dissertation examples carefully and make sure your reference any material accordingly. Below is a list of business dissertation examples for you to look into, this also includes a vast collection of MBA dissertation examples.

Business Dissertation Examples | MBA Dissertation Titles

Marketing Dissertation Examples

There will be a period of time during your marketing degree when you need to start planning in advance to your final year. I do suggest to students to start investigating and formulating a dissertation topic and dissertation title during the second year of a degree. You do not want to leave this task until the last year or final semester of the last year as you will be at a disadvantage. Students should start looking at marketing dissertation examples as soon as possible especially if there is a break in the studies. Always do the ground work well in advance, I knew the dissertation topic I wanted to write part way through my second year. Soon after, I carefully analyzed dissertation examples in this field of study.

Students should obtain a good set of undergraduate and postgraduate marketing dissertation examples. As mentioned above, these can be obtained from university libraries, the internet and research material you have already written. Below are links that will take you to a large quantity of marketing dissertation examples. I’m sure you will find marketing dissertation topics that are relevant to your field of study.

Marketing Dissertation Examples | Marketing Dissertation Titles

Construction Dissertation Examples

There are a number of techniques where you can access existing construction dissertation examples and use them as a foundation for your own work, thus trying to understand the specifics of the thesis or dissertation you have to produce. As previously mentioned, do try to see if the university library has dissertation topics and titles for you to analyse, if not, search the internet for research material and construction related forums and blogs. We do offer construction dissertation examples and we often visit related blogs such as The Chartered Institute of Building (CIOB), Constructionomics and BDCnetwork all of which will help you with your own research dissertation as the material on offer is first class, current and expansive. The link provided below will illustrate the vast amount of construction dissertation examples we have to offer.

Construction Dissertation Examples

HRM Dissertation Examples

This post sets out to help students select the most appropriate topic for their HRM dissertation and to provide practical advice on how a HRM dissertation should be structured in order to achieve the best possible grade. You may have already looked at the HRM dissertation titles we have on offer and we appreciate that there is a wide variety of topics in this subject area, so it may be prudent to seek out and analyse HRM dissertation examples available at your university library or internet.

Below are links to access an extensive list of quality HRM Dissertation examples. Students may use them to meet the requirements of their own HRM dissertation, or view the titles in order to gain some inspiration. Either way, ensure you reference all material accordingly as you do not want fall foul of plagiarism.

HRM Dissertation Examples

Finance Dissertation Examples

Finance and accounting is often perceived as a difficult subject area especially when it comes to writing a dissertation. When you choose your finance dissertation topic try to keep in mind that the topic chosen should current and up to date. Don’t write a finance dissertation on stock performance from the last decade or on failed banks as that is too predictable. Have a look at what is happening now in the world of finance, or try to write a finance dissertation that predicts the outcome of a seismic event such as Brexit or potential collapse of the Euro currency. That is why looking at current finance dissertation examples is a must as you will be kept abreast of any new theories in this field of research.

When writing your finance dissertation you have to make decisions regarding the content, area of study and formulate the topic. Below are finance dissertation examples that will help you in your studies. We urge you to take a look and reference any material accordingly.

Finance Dissertation Examples

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Best HRM Dissertation Topics For University Students

Best University Dissertations
Best University Dissertations

Dissertation topics chosen will be wide ranging and students are encouraged to work in areas of particular personal interest, providing they are relevant to the objectives of the pathway. There is no doubt that student will be required to complete the Research Methods module to provide the underpinning skills and knowledge required to undertake a dissertation.

Dissertation Writing Outcomes

To enable students to undertake a substantial piece of empirical research within a topic area of their own choosing relevant to the objectives of the pathway

  • To allow students to demonstrate their ability to undertake a piece of work requiring an element of original inquiry
  • To enable students to identify a specific research question, review the literature in that area, select and justify using a particular research methodology to collect, analyse and interpret secondary and primary data, the balance of which will vary depending on the individual project
  • To allow students to display their initiative and develop their time management skills
  • To develop students ability for critical thought and evaluation

Once you have completed your own dissertation you will be able to:

  • Produce clearly stated analytical framework for the study including aims and objectives
  • Systematically develop an empirical investigation, using a research methodology to gather data for analysis and critical interpretation
  • Present firm conclusions and recommendations (as appropriate) demonstrating that the objectives set have been achieved
  • Write a formal research report to professional standards
  • Provide evidence on the use of initiative, time management and self expression

Start writing your dissertation early. Write a section at a time as you complete them; don’t try writing the report all at once. Give yourself plenty of time for revision, correcting and for formatting the document – this can be very time-consuming. Discuss and agree with your supervisor arrangements for sending and returning completed text to each other. Don’t forget to reference dissertation examples accordingly.

If you enjoyed reading this post on how to obtain and use existing dissertations I would be very grateful if you could help spread this knowledge by emailing this post to a friend, or sharing it on Twitter or Facebook. Thank you.

Undergraduate Dissertation Examples

Undergraduate Dissertation Examples

Title: Working with Undergraduate Dissertation Examples. An undergraduate dissertation or thesis is a document submitted in accordance of candidature for an academic degree or professional qualification at university. The term dissertation is used in the UK to refer to a final year undergraduate project. In essence, an undergraduate dissertation presents research conducted by an author which is ultimately reviewed and graded by academic staff.

This article written on undergraduate dissertation examples provides support and guidance for personal study and to help you through the undergraduate dissertation process. It highlights some of the common questions, concerns and practical issues that undergraduate students come across when completing their dissertation or final year project. So, we aim to provide a useful overview on how best to use undergraduate dissertation examples during your academic studies.

The content provided on our website was written by students, academic and support staff who have a particular interest and experience in writing undergraduate dissertations in various fields of study. Our site has not been produced with the aim of providing a set of definitive answers for your own chosen topic of study. Instead, we offer a collection of pre-written undergraduate dissertation examples. We do not write undergraduate dissertations for students, we leave that to students themselves.

Undergraduate Dissertation Examples
Undergraduate Dissertation Examples

How to best use Undergraduate Dissertation Examples

You can make best use of pre-written undergraduate dissertation examples in various ways and at various stages of the dissertation process. For example, before you start the dissertation, you can use existing undergraduate dissertation examples to:

  • Explore what the demands and challenges of a dissertation are.
  • Raise questions that you can ask your academic supervisor about.
  • Help you think through what theme you could pursue in your dissertation.
  • Help you prepare a research question.

If you have already started your own dissertation, you can undergraduate dissertation examples to:

  • Clarify issues about specific chapters of the dissertation.
  • Focus on key aspects of the dissertation such as timelines, structure, ethical issues and marking criteria.
  • Organise the different stages of the dissertation. Remember, by failing to prepare, you are preparing to fail.

Undergraduate Dissertation Examples

Our website has a wide selection of undergraduate dissertation examples written on a variety of subject areas. These subjects are:

  • Business Management
  • Business Strategy
  • Marketing Strategy
  • Marketing Communications
  • Branding and Advertising
  • Economic Theory
  • Finance and Accounting
  • Business Law
  • Building Studies
  • Quantity Surveying
  • Construction Management
  • Human Resource Management
  • Nursing and Midwifery
  • Health Studies
  • Communication Studies
  • Media Studies

Benefits of using Undergraduate Dissertation Examples

It is safe to say that well written undergraduate dissertation examples have important factors that should be looked at in order to help you write your own research dissertation. These include the ability to be read and understood the research question you have in hand. Demonstrate the ability to capture the necessary facts so that you can successfully underpin and substantiate your research dissertation. Your research needs to be based on facts and not conjecture. You need to demonstrate the ability to follow the agreed format for writing a dissertation at your institution, it is important that you follow the guidelines outlined by your university. Students often gain a low mark in their dissertation as they used a bespoke format and structure. Most of all, you need the ability to communicate a certain message to whoever will reading your dissertation research, the dissertation must not deviate away from the research question or become uninteresting for the reader.

It is worthwhile noting that your dissertation should satisfy the rules of formal grammar because it is purely for academic purposes and will be treated as such. This is where pre-written undergraduate dissertation examples prove to be very useful indeed.

If you enjoyed reading this article, I would be very grateful if you could help spread this knowledge by emailing this post to a friend, or sharing it on Twitter or Facebook. Thank you.

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Advertising Dissertations

Click here to view Undergraduate Dissertation Examples

What Is A Dissertation

What Is A Dissertation?

Many students ask us the question – What Is A Dissertation?… Well, your dissertation will be the most challenging aspect of your university study. It may also be an unfamiliar mode of assessment that requires you to engage independently with your subject matter, at a level of both breadth and detail that is perhaps not typical of most other forms of assessment. A crucial aspect of all this is to ensure that you are aware of all the elements involved in the dissertation writing process and that you allow yourself adequate time to do your dissertation topic justice. At most universities around the world, a dissertation or thesis is an extended piece of academic writing based on extensive reading of a subject area and independent research at an undergraduate or postgraduate level. Having been the longest established sample dissertations website we are here to assist and support you in preparing your own dissertation project by giving you some general information on how a dissertation is structured and what a dissertation is.

Many of you will be expected to construct and submit your own original idea for a dissertation topic, though students in certain disciplines (e.g. business) may either be given a specific topic, or expected to choose from a list of suitable projects. Nonetheless, it is advisable that you start to think about your choice of dissertation topic at the earliest possible early stage of your final year, if not earlier. Let’s make no mistake about it, your dissertation research project is probably the single most important task you will undertake whilst at university or college, and is often a key indicator of your true capabilities as a student and researcher. In addition to the information contained in this article, you must refer to the instructions and guidelines outlined in your nominated study program. It is worth noting that different subject areas have different expectations, referencing styles and support mechanisms for the dissertation. For example, in some areas you are able to formulate your own dissertation title, whilst in others you will be required to choose from a list of predefined titles. The content and structure of a dissertation can differ across national boundaries and level of study.

What Is A Dissertation
What Is A Dissertation

The structure of an undergraduate dissertation written at a UK university can differ immensely to an undergraduate dissertation written at a North American university. This is due to how learning content is delivered and taught and many words can be used interchangeably. For example a dissertation abstract can be referred to as a dissertation synopsis. Similarly, a dissertation appendix can be referred to as an annexure. Some universities encourage The Harvard System of referencing while other universities prefer citing dissertations using the APA, MLA, Chicago and AAA Styles, the list goes on. Nonetheless, a dissertation is, in essence, a piece of research submitted in support of submission for an academic degree or professional qualification presenting the author’s research and findings. Never lose sight of this. We at study-aids.co.uk will give an insightful overview to what a dissertation is:

A Dissertation Adheres To Certain Fundamental Principles Of Academic Writing:

  • It is a structured piece of writing that develops a clear line of thought in response to a central question or plan.
  • What Is A Dissertation?… A dissertation is an extended piece of work, usually divided into chapters, and containing a significantly more detailed examination of your subject matter and evidence than is the case for most essays.
  • Because you usually have much more responsibility in choosing your research topic, and for sourcing supporting material, your dissertation provides evidence of your ability to carry out highly independent study and research.
  • You are typically expected to be clear about the methodology you have used to gather and evaluate your evidence. This aspect of producing a dissertation has much greater emphasis than in a typical essay or assignment.
  • Those of you undertaking analysis of quantitative data must similarly ensure that you adhere to the methodological requirements expected within your academic discipline and that you utilise the appropriate software such as SPSS and SYSTAT. You must satisfy yourself as to these requirements within your subject area.

It is highly advisable for you to ask your supervisor where you can find details of any regulations about your dissertation, such as its word count, structure and submission details. You should pay special attention to this. Hopefully, we have answered your question of what is a dissertation.

Dissertation Structure

Abstract

The length of the Abstract should be no more than 300-500 words, but not included in the formal word count.

The purpose of this very short section is to tell the reader something about the contents. About 1/3 of the Abstract should explain what you intended to do (parameters). The other 2/3rds should tell the reader what you did, including recommendations.

The Abstract may duplicate some material included in the Introduction and/or Conclusion

Introduction

The length of the Introduction should be about 10% of the whole dissertation.

The Introduction gives you the opportunity to provide your reader with an overview of the dissertation. Firstly, introduce the topic; secondly, outline the key areas to be covered; and identify your primary aims and objectives.

The background section should be short and securely focused on the topic, real statistical data can be included.

Larger themes, as well as specific topics, should be identified

Literature Review

The length of the Literature review should be about 20% of whole dissertation.

This chapter gives you an opportunity to show the reader that you have learned to analyse and to synthesise the views of others in relation to your own research programme.

The Literature Review is NOT a Book Review. Contents of books and articles are only useful if particular points have some direct relevance to your dissertation. In Literature Review you should compare and contrast ideas, theories and/or views relevant to your proposed research topic. Keep in mind that at least 10 references should be discussed and 3-4 different models or theories or views should be mentioned.

At the end of this chapter, identify the principal research questions to be addressed in the dissertation. These will form the basis of your dissertation in the subsequent chapter on Research Methodology.

Research Methodology

The Research Methodology chapter in length should be about 20% of whole dissertation.

This chapter gives you an opportunity to discuss the research programme that you have designed for your dissertation.

Begin by reviewing briefly some common methods advocated for structuring research programmes.

Then look again at the research questions formulated at the end of the Literature Review. Select the kind of programme best suited for addressing those particular research questions, and discus the reasons prompting your decision.

Discuss the research strategies adopted, the collection procedures selected and the difficulties and/or problems encountered.

Findings and Discussion

You might divide this chapter for two like:

    • Analysis of Findings
    • Discussion

This is the largest and probably the most important part in assessing your research by examiners. The length of this section should be about 30% of the whole dissertation.

The Findings and Discussion chapter gives you an opportunity to discuss your research findings.

Your findings may be derived from the analyses of statistical data, interviews, questionnaires or any viable combination of instruments used for research collection and the measurement of data.

Link important points of this chapter back to principle ideas in the Literature Review with the evidence obtained in your own research.

End this chapter with a brief summary of you findings. This, in turn, should set the scene for the concluding chapter.

Conclusions and Recommendations

Again you can divide this chapter on two smaller parts:

  • Conclusions
  • Recommendations or Recommendations from the future studies

This chapter in lengths should be about 15% of the whole dissertation.

The Conclusions and Recommendations chapter gives you the opportunity to evaluate the effectiveness of your research programme and to offer recommendations, if desired.

Conclusions can be rather short, because the bulk of the analysis and synthesis of material will probably have taken place in the chapter of Findings and Discussion.

In your Conclusions be sure that all of the questions raised in the Literature Review have been addressed. Weigh the final results of your research against the original aims and objectives of the dissertation. Anomalies, for example, can be important and interesting.

Add recommendations if you desired. Ideas for further research and/or some strategies advocated for better management of the issue or the enterprise are particularly useful.

Bibliography

Not included in the word count

This part of the dissertation gives you the opportunity to show the reader what research sources were used in your dissertation.

All books articles, sources of statistical data and web sites used in the dissertation must be listed in the bibliography. Additional sources consulted should be also be placed in the bibliography

Entries in the Bibliography should be placed in alphabetical order. Web sites, however, should be grouped together separately at the end of the Bibliography.

Appendices

Not included in the word count

This part of the dissertation gives you an opportunity to add interesting research material to your dissertation.

Interview summaries and sample questionnaires, for example, should appear in the Appendices

Click Here To View Sample Dissertations

Dissertation Structure

Dissertation Structure

Your research dissertation may prove to be the longest piece of academic writing you will undertake during your studies, but there are useful methods that will assist you in making the task of writing a dissertation less troublesome. It is important to note that structure is critical along with time management; you should allocate a reasonable amount of time on structuring your dissertation correctly. It will help you gain a better overall grade and having a structured dissertation will keep you on track. This article will outline the typical structure of a dissertation.

Title Page

The dissertation title is an ideal opportunity to tell the reader and academic supervisor what your research is focused on. You will need it to be explicit, concise, on topic, descriptive, and representative of the research topic you have undertaken. More likely than not, there will be a required format for the title page in your research discipline, it is advisable to check how a title page is constructed at your institution, it may be best to check with your supervisor and locate previously written title pages by fellow students. I have written three dissertations during my time spent in education and the illustration below shows how I constructed my dissertation title page;

Dissertation Structure
Dissertation Structure

This tends to be the shortest and most concise section of your thesis or dissertation, but it is advisable in taking great care to write it well. Fundamentally, the abstract is a brief summary of the research undertaken. It should be able to represent the dissertation aim and objectives, and what the results and implications of the research are. In most cases a dissertation abstract is only one page long and you may have to adhere to a word limit, it is worth checking this with your supervisor and university guidelines. Be mindful that the dissertation abstract is an important section of your dissertation or thesis, it will naturally become a document in its own right, and there is a possibility that your dissertation may become registered on an academic database. Now that prospect sounds exciting. As the abstract comes before the main body of the dissertation, it may be prudent to write the abstract at an early stage when constructing your dissertation or thesis. It may form the framework for your research and will act as an aid in identifying the dissertation rationale and findings. This in turn will help formulate the structure of the dissertation.

Click the link to read further information about dissertation abstracts

Acknowledgements

This section is not mandatory and I tend not to include an acknowledgements section in my research. If you decide to include this, it will be an opportunity to mention individuals who have been particularly helpful to you while you have been writing your dissertation. Casting your eye over previously written acknowledgements by fellow students will give you a rough idea of the ways in which different kinds of guidance and support has been appreciated and mentioned. Again, this is not a mandatory section and you will not get downgraded for not including an acknowledge section.

Contents Page and List of Figures

The contents page in its simplest form denotes the structure of the dissertation. Any discrepancy in space devoted to different sections of dissertation content will become noticeable, it is important that the contents outlined in the contents page match the headings and subheadings throughout the document. Be mindful that many universities assess the presentation of a dissertation and the content structure is often seen as a significant contributor towards the final grade of a dissertation. It is recommended that you build a separate contents list for data tables, charts, figures and graphs.

Dissertation Contents
Dissertation Contents

Introduction

In most cases this is the first section of writing the reader encounters after the abstract or executive summary, it is often best to leave its preparation to last as, until then, you will not be totally sure what you are introducing, it is far easier to write an introduction once your dissertation is near to completion. When writing a dissertation the introduction has two primary roles (1) to expand the material summarized in the abstract section and (2) to indicate the content of the dissertation sections. I strongly advise that you include the following points to your dissertation introduction;

  1. Research aims and objectives
  2. Research concepts
  3. Dissertation rationale
  4. Methodology employed and scope
  5. Brief outline of research questions and hypotheses
  6. How collated data was analyzed and where it originated from
  7. Structure of the dissertation

Click the link to read further information about a dissertation introduction

Literature Review

The main purpose of the literature review is to demonstrate that you have painstakingly explored and understand where your dissertation or thesis fits into the research field you have undertaken, have you identified existing theory and how does this relate to your research? You should be able to demonstrate the ability to identify key scholars and theories applicable to your research dissertation and how you have applied, assessed and critiqued this research. To do this you need to;

  1. Define the current state of research in your chosen subject area
  2. Assess whether there are any closely related areas that you also need to refer to in your research dissertation
  3. Identify any gaps in literature where you argue that further research needs to be explored and added
  4. Explain how you plan to address research gaps

This can lead to a clear statement of the research questions or hypotheses that you will be addressing. Further to the research context, there may be additional research contexts to present in your research. Typically, this would include;

  1. Theoretical or hypothetical context
  2. Methodological or operational context
  3. Practice context
  4. Political context

Undoubtedly, it may prove a little difficult to identify the optimal sequence for the above contexts as your specific research questions can be complex and there may be a handful of reasons why the research is needed in the field of study. It is worthwhile taking additional time to develop a fluid structure as this will help to convince examiners of the relevance of your research and that you understand its significance to field of study. The literature review should also be a straightforward description of how you conducted the research and how you referenced existing literature and theory.

The literature review reflects on critical points of current knowledge including findings written by prominent scholars, as well as theoretical and methodological contributions to a particular topic. Remember that a literature review is a secondary research source, and as such, do not report any unpublished, developmental or experimental research. Also, a literature review has a prominence in setting the research undertaken within the body of literature and to provide a clear context for the reader. Never forget that academic literature reviews are an integral element for research in nearly every academic field, regardless of the level of study.

Click the link to read further information about a dissertation literature review

Results and Findings

Many academics perceive the results and findings as the most fascinating and worthwhile elements of a research study, many scholars unearth significant results that can radically change the way a subject area is perceived. Many see this as a Eureka Moment. As a student, you will need to check which style of academic writing is best suited to your field of study. For example a scientific dissertation will have a clear separation between the results and the discussion of results presented; whereas a social science dissertation will contain a findings section that brings the results and discussion together to formulate a conclusion.

Click the link to read further information about dissertation findings

Discussion

The discussion section will allow you to evaluate the research in relation to the wider study, this will ascertain if you have kept your research on topic or not, and if you’ve answered the questions you intended or not. You will be able to refer back to the initial dissertation rationale that you gave for your introduction and literature review sections. You will also be able to see how impactful your research is and discuss what your own research study has added in the respective field. It is important to show that you appreciate the limitations of your research (be realistic) and how these may affect the validity and impact of the research findings. If you have acknowledged certain research limitations, you can report on the implications of your findings for theory, research, and practice in general.

Conclusions and Final Thoughts

Normally, this section of the dissertation tends to be much shorter than the aforementioned discussion. It is not a simple summary of your research by any degree, but needs to conclude concisely the main points that have been unearthed and what they mean for your chosen field of study. Be sure to highlight significant contributions and noteworthy outcomes from the research findings.

Referencing

This critical section of the dissertation needs to be organized, exact and must include all of your references in the required referencing style outlined in your university’s referencing guidelines.

As you add to and edit your dissertation you will probably gain and lose references that you had in earlier document versions. With this in mind, it will be advantageous to version control your documents up until completion (dissertation_v1.1.docx). It is vital to check that all the references contained in your dissertation are referenced accurately within the reference or bibliography section. From my personal experiences, I always checked to see if I could find every reference in the bibliography in the main body of the dissertation this means that you can locate any missing references and add them without running the risk of plagiarism. It is important that you reference all material used, I cannot stress this enough.

Click the link to read further information about dissertation referencing

Appendices

This section of the dissertation is very useful indeed. Items that normally appear in the appendices are those that a reader would want to see, but which would take up too much space and disrupt the flow if placed within the main body of the research. You can add your supporting documentation such as research questionnaires, cover letters, statistics, list of acronyms and photographs. It is worthwhile finding out if the appendices count towards the final word limit for your dissertation, normally the appendices do not. Be sure to reference the appendices within the main body of the research where necessary.

Click the link to read further information about dissertation appendices

Dissertation Structure Tips

  • Below are some dissertation tips that have proved useful throughout my time spent in education, I am sure that some of the bullet points below will prove useful to you;
  • Write your research as you go along, do this on the fly. Inspiration comes when you have information fresh in your mind if you cannot do this; write it down on a piece of paper and revisit it in the future. There is nothing more frustrating than losing an inspirational moment.
  • It is advantageous to keep track of how your research ideas are developing and writing helps clarify your thought processes. This negates the need to cram in thousands of words at the end of your dissertation this would lead to an imbalanced research project.
  • As previously mentioned, you do not have to start with an introduction; I have always found it easier to write an introduction once I have completed subsequent chapters such as the literature review or methodology. Alternatively, you may prefer to write the introduction first, so you can get your ideas formulated from the outset. There is every chance that you will add to and edit the introduction at some point.
  • Think of each chapter as a mini research project in itself. Each chapter should have a clear and concise introduction and conclusion. Use the chapter conclusion to link back to the overall research question and theoretical linkages to previous chapters.
  • Imagine the main questions and hypotheses of your dissertation as a river, and each chapter is a stream feeding into this, there should be fluidity from start to finish, you do not want to tie the reader up in knots. The individual chapters will contain their own opinions, and go their own way, but they all contribute to the main flow of the research project. Remember that a good dissertation structure is important.
  • Don’t go off on a tangent and don’t create your own bespoke dissertation structure, this will count against you. Always refer to your university guidelines if you are unsure.

Creating a good dissertation structure requires extra time, effort and preparation. “By failing to prepare, you are preparing to fail.” – Benjamin Franklin

Do you have any additional points that could be added to this post?

Example Dissertation Abstracts

Dissertation Abstracts

Title: Example Dissertation Abstracts – So, what is a dissertation abstract? Many academic institutions across different countries have contrasting views to what a dissertation abstract is. At study-aids.co.uk we believe that an abstract, in its purest form, is a concise summary of the entire dissertation this includes the dissertation topic, rationale and overview of the conclusions. A primary objective of an abstract is to provide the reader with a firm understanding of the content of the dissertation; this would include a concise synopsis of the dissertation aims and objectives.

It is important to note that the abstract will help a reader decide whether to read the whole dissertation or thesis in detail, or skip to the key findings. It is important to write an engaging and meaningful abstract so that you can inspire interest in your dissertation. Some students write a disjointed abstract which leads to low interest shown towards the dissertation, it is advisable that you engage the reader from the outset. Be mindful that a dissertation abstract is not an introduction its primary purpose is to summarise not introduce, many students lose sight of this.

In most cases the abstract is found at the beginning of the dissertation immediately after the dissertation title page. Dissertation or thesis abstracts tend to be separate from the main body of research and are often held in a university’s database of dissertation abstracts, there will be many dissertation abstracts contained within your university’s database. You may find that the abstract is available but not the entire dissertation project, you will have to contact the author to gain access to the research if this is the case. Nonetheless, you will get a clear understanding of the dissertation project from the contents of the abstract.

How Long Should A Dissertation Abstract Be?

As previously mentioned, dissertation abstracts differ depending on institution, location and level of study. A typical undergraduate and postgraduate dissertation abstract written at a UK university will be approximately 350 words in length. It is worthwhile noting that word count is important, 350 words will be adequate provided you write concisely and are summarizing your dissertation. Be mindful that academic electronic databases automatically truncate abstracts beyond a certain length. It is safe to say that academic databases such as ETHOS and JSTOR will omit sections of the abstract if it is deemed too long or convoluted, 350 words would suffice.

How To Write A Good Dissertation Abstract

Writing a good dissertation abstract has its perils, there is so much reference material and advice available at your disposal but in some cases this advice appears confusing and often conflicts with what you already know. We suggest you consult your university library in the first instance and have a conversation with your dissertation tutor; this will definitely set you on the correct path.

There are key points of interest you need to include in your abstract. Why did you undertake the study? What were you examining or investigating in the dissertation project. Be sure to return to your research question and ensure you have defined it concisely and succinctly. A good opening is often, “This dissertation study tested…”, “This dissertation study investigated…”, “This dissertation study examines…”. A dissertation abstract example will be included in this post. It is advisable to include what was done and how you achieved it. Be precise, don’t make broad statements. This is will differ depending on whether your dissertation is an empirical or a literature review structured research project. What did you find? Include specific outcomes and highlight conclusions on the research you will present. “The results from the survey questionnaire found that 83% of UK respondents are not aware that the European Court of Human Rights impacts the UK law system…”. “There was a significant relationship between low employee morale and high employee turnover…”

Dissertation Abstracts
Dissertation Abstracts

Example Dissertation Abstracts

This dissertation study examines what drives the children of the self-employed to enter self-employment themselves. In the aftermath of the financial crisis and from the subsequent development that many working places have been outsourced, the Danish government has elaborated an initiative to increase the rate of entrepreneurs to support economic growth in Denmark. It has been found that it is the enterprises of those new entrepreneurs, which are the primary engine in creating new jobs. However, research shows that despite the Danish welfare system, which provides safety in terms of unemployment, Danes are very reluctant in becoming entrepreneurs. One exception to this rule is the children of entrepreneurs. Their chances of entering self-employment are much higher, as investigated on basis of statistical data from IDA.

Through a constructive approach, this dissertation seeks to investigate what drives the children of the self-employed to enter self-employment themselves in their later life. This investigation is performed on three cases of second generation self-employed. The theories used in this dissertation to investigate the aforementioned are all within the constructivist paradigm. Building on Karl Weicks sense making theory, this dissertation views sense making as meaning constructed through stories. Those stories are analysed with a narrative framework, through this analytical tool the construction of motivational and supportive parameters are analysed. Furthermore, building on discourse theory of Laclau and Mouffe, this dissertation views social reality as constructed through language, in respect of articulations and discourses. Those discourses are analysed through the application of discourse analysis. With this analytical tool the articulation of the difference between the self-employed and the employee, and also the articulation of the upbringing of the second generation self-employed are analysed. Lastly, the analyses are being integrated through the sense making perspective. Finally, the dissertation concludes that the exposure to the self-employed as a role-model in childhood, plus the insight and emotional values attached to the identity of being self-employed, on one hand gives aspirations to enter self-employment, but on the other hand excludes the second generation self-employed from choosing a career as an employee.

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Collection of Dissertation Abstracts